Climate Science News

September 2018 : CALL FOR ABSTRACTS for the "25 years of Progress in Radar Altimetry" Symposium

AVISO Climate Change News - Tue, 2018-01-16 07:01


    Following on from the "15 Years of Progress in Radar Altimetry"  Symposium in 2006 and the "20 Years of Progress in Radar Altimetry"  Symposium in 2012, in Venice-Lido, Italy, both deemed very successful landmarks by the participants and the readership of the Proceedings, we are now at the twenty-five year anniversary of the launch of ERS-1 and TOPEX/POSEIDON. To mark this occasion the  European Space Agency, in collaboration with the French Space Agency,  CNES, is organising an exceptional Symposium on "25 Years of Progress in Radar Altimetry". This event will also be sponsored by other partner agencies and organisations supporting the development of altimetry. Along with this symposium, several related events will take place on the same week, including the annual meeting of the Ocean Surface Topography Science Team (OSTST) and the International Doris Service (IDS) workshop. These events will be held over 6 days, from 24 to 29 of September 2018, in Ponta Delgada, São Miguel Island, Azores Archipelago (Portugal). 

    Please consider your participation at this exceptional event and reserve the week from 24 to 29 September 2018 in your agenda.

 

    For the Symposium, the abstracts submission opens today.  You are kindly invited to submit your abstract(s) not later than 1 March 2018.

    Please link to http://www.altimetry2018.org to get familiar with the Themes & Objectives and the type of presentation to request (Oral Keynote, Oral Review, Oral or Poster) and to submit your (max 500 words) abstract(s).

    Abstracts will be selected by the Scientific Committee on the basis of their scientific content and relevance to the themes of the symposium. Authors will be notified of the decision and the type of presentation (Oral Keynote, Oral Review, Oral or Poster) by 27 April 2018.

 

    For OSTST and IDS meetings, additional information and call for contributions will be sent out separately.

 

    Looking forward to another great "slow-time" event like the 15 and 20 Years of Progress in Radar Altimetry held in Venice in 2006 and 2012,
an exceptional scientific Symposium on "25  Years  of  Progress  in  Radar  Altimetry"!

    Looking forward to your participation!

Categories: Climate Science News

April 2018: Call for abstracts for the "International Review Workshop On Satellite Altimetry Cal/Val Activities and Applications"

AVISO Climate Change News - Tue, 2018-01-09 03:09
The call for abstracts is now open for the  "International Review Workshop On Satellite Altimetry Cal/Val Activities and Applications".  This International Review is to be held in Chania, Crete, Greece, 23-26 April 2018 and is sponsored by the European Space Agency, EUMETSAT and the IAG/IUGG Commission 2.

The aim is to present the latest research results in the field of satellite altimetry calibration and altimetry applications for monitoring ocean changes and for improving Earth observation in an objective, continuous, homogeneous and reliable manner, free of errors and biases, and tied from one altimetry mission to the next. The intention is to support long-term monitoring of climate changes by understanding better environmental changes on world's oceans, terrestrial surface waters, but also on Arctic and Antarctic polar regions. The final outcome is to establish and promote a scientific roadmap with procedures, protocols, guidelines, and best practices in an open and transparent way to be followed by any international group working on satellite altimetry to attain SI traceability of their measurements, results and data products.

Please visit the website is http://www.frm4alt.eu/int-cal-val-review  for further information and updates. 
Categories: Climate Science News

24-31 December 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2018-01-04 06:35
Les satellites, un outil indispensable dans la bataille pour le climat (Sciences et Avenir, 2017/12/31) Un nouvel océan en formation au niveau de la Corne de l’Afrique (Science Post, 2017/12/27) Des données satellitaires globales permettent de mettre en évidence des empreintes des courants océaniques sur la tension de vent induites par des interactions entre l'océan et atmosphère (INSU, 2017/12/26) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

Baked Alaska and 2017 in review

NSIDC Artic Sea Ice News - Wed, 2018-01-03 12:26

Arctic sea ice extent in December 2017 was below average in both the far northern Atlantic and the Bering Sea, and notably high temperatures prevailed over most of the Arctic, especially over Central Alaska. We look back at the year’s events, and examine Arctic sea ice trends since 1850 based on a new compilation of data from maps, ship reports, and other records.

Overview of conditions Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent for December 2016 was 11.75 million square kilometers (4.54 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that month.

Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent for December 2017 was 11.75 million square kilometers (4.54 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that month. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Arctic sea ice extent for December 2017 averaged 11.75 million square kilometers (4.54 million square miles), the second lowest in the 1979 to 2017 satellite record. This was 1.09 million square kilometers (420,900 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average and 280,000 square kilometers (108,100 square miles) above the record low December extent recorded in 2016. Extent at the end of the month was below average in the far northern Atlantic Ocean and Barents Sea, slightly above average in western Hudson Bay, and continued to be below average in the Bering and Chukchi Seas. Near-average conditions prevailed along the eastern coast of Greenland and in the Sea of Okhotsk.

Conditions in context Figure 2. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of January 2, 2018, along with daily ice extent data for four previous years. 2017 to 2018 is shown in blue, 2016 to 2017 in green, 2015 to 2014 in orange, 2014 to 2015 in brown, 2013 to 2014 in purple, and 2012 to 2012 in dotted brown. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data.

Figure 2a. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of January 2, 2018, along with daily ice extent data for five previous years. 2017 to 2018 is shown in blue, 2016 to 2017 in green, 2015 to 2014 in orange, 2014 to 2015 in brown, 2013 to 2014 in purple, and 2012 to 2012 in dotted brown. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data. Sea Ice Index data.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

 NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division

Figure 2b. This plot shows the departure from average air temperatures at the 925 hPa level in degrees Celsius for December 2017. Yellows and reds indicate higher than average temperatures; blues and purples indicate lower than average temperatures.

Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division
High-resolution image

Figure 2c. This plot shows the departure from average sea level pressures at the 925 hPa level in degrees Celsius for December 2018. Yellows and reds indicate higher than average air pressures; blues and purples indicate lower than average air pressures.|

Figure 2c. This plot shows the departure from average sea level pressures at the 925 hPa level in degrees Celsius for December 2018. Yellows and reds indicate higher than average air pressures; blues and purples indicate lower than average air pressures.

Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division
High-resolution image

Ice growth during December 2017 averaged 59,800 square kilometers (23,100 square miles) per day. This was fairly close to the average rate for the month of 64,100 square kilometers (24,800 square miles) per day. Ice growth in the Chukchi Sea (very late compared to previous years), the Kara Sea, and the eastern Hudson Bay areas were the main regions of change in December. In contrast, the ice edge slightly retreated in the Barents Sea near Franz Josef Land.

December air temperatures at the 925 hPa level (about 2,500 feet above sea level) throughout the Arctic Ocean were 2 to 6 degrees Celsius (4 to 11 degrees Fahrenheit) above average. Prominent warm spots were found over north Central Asia and Central Alaska (more than 10 degrees Celsius, or 18 degrees Fahrenheit above average), as well as over Svalbard and Central Siberia (nearly 6 degrees Celsius or 11 degrees Fahrenheit above average). Temperatures were 2 to 3 degrees Celsius (4 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit) below average in Eastern Siberia.

The air temperature pattern in December was similar to that seen in November, driven in part by the arrangement of high and low air pressure regions surrounding the Arctic. Below-average pressure over easternmost Siberia and above-average pressure over the Gulf of Alaska drove southwesterly winds into Central Alaska and the Yukon region. Warmth in the Central Arctic and in Svalbard was consistent with southerly winds arising from low pressure over Scandinavia and higher pressure in the Laptev Sea and Central Siberia.

The Arctic Oscillation (AO) is a key climate indicator for general wind, precipitation, and temperature patterns in the Arctic. The AO index was moderately positive through most of 2017, indicating a tendency toward strong circumpolar winds at high latitude and warm conditions in the mid-latitudes. December 2017 had a mix of conditions, resulting in a near-neutral AO state (as measured by the index).

December 2017 compared to previous years Figure 3. Monthly December ice extent for 1979 to 2017 shows a decline of 3.7 percent per decade.

Figure 3. Monthly December ice extent for 1979 to 2017 shows a decline of 3.7 percent per decade.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

The linear rate of sea ice decline for December is 47,400 square kilometers (18,300 square miles) per year or 3.7 percent per decade. Recall from our previous post that NSIDC has revised the way in which monthly average extents are computed, which has some impacts on computed trends.

2017 year in review Figure 4. These figures show trends for sea ice-over dates in the Beaufort (top) and Chukchi (bottom) Seas.

Figure 4. These figures show trends for ice-over dates in the Beaufort (top) and Chukchi (bottom) Seas. Sea Ice Index data.

Credit: R. Thoman, NOAA
High-resolution image

The winter of 2016 to 2017 saw record low winter sea ice extent and higher than average temperatures. Indeed, the first four months of 2017 set or tied record low extents for the month. However, the melt season progressed somewhat slowly from May through July, as storminess and relatively cool conditions began to prevail. As such, sea ice extent at the seasonal minimum, on September 13, ended up as eighth lowest.

Assessments of sea ice thickness modeled by the Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System (PIOMAS), as well as sea ice age near the seasonal minimum extent indicate that Arctic sea ice remains very low in overall volume. As the year ended, ice extent remained especially low in the Chukchi and Bering Seas. As discussed in an earlier post, the unusually early seasonal ice retreat in the Chukchi Sea this past summer likely relates to a strong inflow of oceanic heat into the region via the Bering Strait. With more heat in the upper ocean at summer’s end, it takes longer for sea ice to form in autumn and winter. Colleague Rick Thoman of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service has assembled a time series of the ice-over dates in both the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas based on the satellite passive microwave record (Figure 4). The ice-over date is defined as the first day that the ice concentration exceeds 95 percent in the region. The trends towards later freeze up in both seas is striking. This has an impact on sea ice thickness as the growth season is shortened, which may lead to thinner ice by the end of winter. On the other hand, later freeze up also means less time for snow accumulation on the sea ice. Since sea ice grows faster for a thinner snowpack, this may partially offset the impacts of late ice formation.

A longer record of Arctic sea ice extent Figure 5a. This figure shows departures from 1850 to 2013 calendar-month averages of Arctic sea ice extent as a function of year (x-axis) and calendar month (y-axis). The color bar at the right shows magnitudes of departures from the average.

Figure 5a. This figure shows departures from 1850 to 2013 calendar-month averages of Arctic sea ice extent as a function of year (x-axis) and calendar month (y-axis). The color bar at the right shows magnitudes of departures from the average.

Credit: J. E. Walsh, F. Fetterer, J. S. Stewart, W. L. Chapman. 2016. Geographical Review; after a figure by J. Stroeve, National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

 F. Fetterer/National Snow and Ice Data Center, NOAA

Figure 5b. These sea ice concentration maps compare the lowest September minimum Arctic sea ice extents for the periods 1850 to 1900, 1901 to 1950, 1951 to 2000, and 2000 to 2013.

Credit: F. Fetterer/National Snow and Ice Data Center, NOAA
High-resolution image

Using a compilation of maps, ship reports, and other records, NOAA has published monthly estimates of Arctic sea ice extent spanning 1850 to 2013. While data in the earlier part of the record is limited, the carefully constructed time series helps to put the more recent satellite record in a longer-term context. Figure 5a shows the decline in extent over the period of satellite observations standing out prominently in comparison with the rest of the record, especially in late summer and early autumn. An earlier period of unusually low summer sea ice extent around 1937 to 1943 (as compared to the 1850 to 2013 average) did not extend to the winter season, and was followed by a few years of significantly higher-than-average summer ice extents. Early in the record (1850 to 1900), winter ice extent was not particularly elevated relative to the 1850 to 2013 average, but summer sea ice extent was quite a bit higher higher than the average. As another way to place recent conditions into a longer context using this data set, we show the years of the lowest September extent recorded within the 50-year periods 1850 to 1900, 1901 to 1950, 1951 to 2000, along with the lowest over the period 2000 to 2013 (Figure 5b). The decline in extent is apparent.

Low sea ice extent in the Antarctic Figure 6. Antarctic sea ice extent for December 2017 was 9.34 million square kilometers (3.61 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that month.

Figure 6. Antarctic sea ice extent for December 2017 was 9.34 million square kilometers (3.61 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that month. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

In the Southern Hemisphere, sea ice for December 2017 averaged 9.34 million square kilometers (3.61 million square miles) and was the fourth lowest in the satellite record. Sea ice extent was far below average in the eastern Weddell Sea, but above average in the northwestern Weddell Sea. The East Antarctic coastline had near-average ice extent. As the Southern Hemisphere entered into the summer months, sea ice declined steeply. Temperatures at the 925 hPa level were 1 to 3 degrees Celsius (2 to 5 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than average in Dronning Maud Land and the northern Ross Sea, and generally lower than average over the ice sheet. Near-average temperatures have prevailed over the fringing Southern Ocean. Pressures were slightly above average over the continent and below average in the surrounding ocean. Consistent with this pattern, the Southern Annular Mode index, a measure of the strength of westerly winds, was moderately positive for December.

Further reading

Walsh, J. E., F. Fetterer, J. S. Stewart, and W. L. Chapman. 2016. A database for depicting Arctic sea ice variations back to 1850. Geographical Review. doi: 10.1111/j.1931-0846.2016.12195.x.

Categories: Climate Science News

January 2018: Antarctic megadunes seen in a Digital Elevation Model from altimetry

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2018-01-03 05:41
Space techniques, including altimetry, enable to map Antarctica and its topography. With the new,...
Categories: Climate Science News

11-18 December 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-12-20 07:33
Climat : « On ne mesure pas l’ampleur du danger » (Le Monde, 2017/12/18) Dérèglement climatique : les températures dans l’Arctique augmentent tellement rapidement que les algorithmes de l’agence américaine qui les suit ont cru à une erreur (Atlantico, 2017/12/17) Que savons-nous de l’avenir du climat ? (France culture, 2017/12/16) La canicule de 2016 a bien été causée par le réchauffement climatique (Sciences et Vie, 2017/12/15) Quelle est la différence entre une mer et un océan? (Sciences et Vie, 2017/12/13) L’ours polaire famélique est-il vraiment victime du réchauffement climatique ? (Le Monde, 2017/12/13) Réchauffement climatique : les prévisions les plus pessimistes sont les plus probables (Le Nouvel Obs, 2017/12/11) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

Aviso+ Users Newsletter #14

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-12-20 03:51
We are pleased to announce you the publication of the fourteenth  Aviso+ Users Newsletter. Contents: 
  • Project News: Ongoing and forthcoming missions, ongoing developments
  • Tools for mesoscale eddy trajectory altas
  • A database of hydrology targets for the new DEM onboard Jason-3
  • Distribution of GPD+: state of the art Wet Tropospheric Correction
  • 15 years of observations of the thickness of Arctic sea ice using satellite altimetry
  • Upcoming high-resolution SSH maps from Dynamic Interpolation
  • Events
Find all the past newsletters here.
Categories: Climate Science News

3-10 December 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-12-14 08:25
Climat : le pôle Nord a chaud, ici on grelotte (Le Parisien, 2017/12/09) Le réchauffement climatique devrait être plus fort que prévu (Le Figaro,2017/12/07) Un continent de plastique dans l'océan ? (France TV education, 2017/12/07) Climat : One planet Summit (CNES, 2017/12/05) Argos, des balises pour l’avenir de la faune sauvage (CNES, 2017/12/05) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

27 November - 3 December, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-12-07 07:51
Alexandra Ter Halle, chimiste :«Le plastique rejeté dans l'océan se fractionne en nanoparticules» (La Dépêche, 2017/12/01) Des balises bio-optiques cartographient en direct la répartition des stocks de carbone dans l'océan austral (Actu-environnement, 2017/11/28) Quand les espèces marines ont besoin d'espace (CNES, 2017/11/28) Dans l'océan Pacifique, une couche d'eau reste isolée du monde (Science et vie, 2017/11/28) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

Record low extent in the Chukchi Sea

NSIDC Artic Sea Ice News - Wed, 2017-12-06 09:45

November 2017 will be remembered not for total Arctic ice extent, which was the third lowest recorded over the period of satellite observations, but for the record low extent in the Chukchi Sea. This is a key area for Arctic Ocean access, and is an indicator of oceanographic influences on sea ice extent.

Overview of conditions  National Snow and Ice Data Center|High-resolution image

Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent for November 2017 was 9.46 million square kilometers (3.65 million square miles). The magenta line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that month. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Arctic sea ice extent for November 2017 averaged 9.46 million square kilometers (3.65 million square miles), the third lowest in the 1979 to 2017 satellite record. This was 1.24 million square kilometers (479,000 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average and 830,000 square kilometers (321,000 square miles) above the record low November extent recorded in 2016. Extent at the end of the month was below average over the Atlantic side of the Arctic, primarily in the Barents and Kara Seas, slightly above average in western Hudson Bay, but far below average in the Chukchi Sea. This continues a pattern of below-average extent in this region that has persisted for the last year.

Conditions in context timeseries graph

Figure 2. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of December 3, 2017, along with daily ice extent data for five previous years. 2017 is shown in blue, 2016 in green, 2015 in orange, 2014 in brown, 2013 in purple, and 2012 in dotted red. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data. Sea Ice Index data.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Ice growth during November 2017 averaged 80,100 square kilometers (30,900 square miles) per day. This was stronger than the average rate for the month of 69,600 square kilometers (26,900 square miles) per day. Ice growth was particularly rapid within Hudson Bay, Baffin Bay, and the Kara Sea.

November air temperatures at 925 hPa (about 3,000 feet above sea level) were above average over essentially all of the Arctic Ocean, with prominent warm spots (more than 6 degrees Celsius, or 11 degrees Fahrenheit above the 1981 to 2010 average) over the Chukchi Sea and north of Svalbard. The unusual warmth in the Chukchi Sea at least in part manifests the extensive open water in this region, but a pattern of winds blowing in from the southwest also appears to have had an influence. The warmth north of Svalbard is more clearly related to the average pattern of atmospheric circulation over the month, with an area of low pressure centered over the Norwegian Sea and an area of high pressure centered north of the Taymyr Peninsula combining to transport warm air into the region.

November 2017 compared to previous years ice extent trend

Figure 3. Monthly November ice extent for 1979 to 2017 shows a decline of 5.14 percent per decade.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

The linear rate of sea ice decline for November is 55,000 square kilometers (21,200 square miles) per year, or 5.14 percent per decade. Recall from our previous post that NSIDC recently revised the way in which monthly average extents are computed, which has minor impacts on computed trends.

Open water in the Chukchi Sea sea ice concentration

Figure 4. The map at top shows an analysis of sea ice concentration on November 30, 2017 in the area of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. The graph at bottom shows the combined sea ice concentration from 1978 to 2017, based on Sea Ice Index data.

Credit: Rick Thoman of the NOAA National Weather Service Alaska Region
High-resolution image

Based on an analysis by Rick Thoman of the NOAA National Weather Service, as of 19 November, ice extent in the combined Beaufort and Chukchi Seas sector was the lowest ever observed in the sea ice record (Figure 4). This was largely driven by the lack of sea ice within the Chukchi Sea. By the end of November, the Beaufort Sea was completely ice-covered. The NOAA analysis makes use of the NSIDC Sea Ice Index data set. As discussed in our June 7 post, the current state of the ice cover in this region likely has its origin as far back as last year, when warm conditions favored the persistence of open water in the Chukchi Sea into December of 2016.

Strong winds from the north occurred for a few days at the end of March and early April, pushing ice southward in the Bering Sea, breaking up the ice in the Chukchi Sea, and even flushing some ice out through the Bering Strait. We also suggested a possible role of a strong oceanic heat inflow to the Chukchi Sea via Bering Strait. In support of this view, in the summer of 2017, Rebecca Woodgate of the University of Washington, Seattle, sailing on the research vessel Norseman II, recovered mooring data that indicated an early arrival of warm ocean water in the strait, about a month earlier than the average. This resulted in June ocean temperatures that were 3 degrees Celsius (5 degrees Fahrenheit) above average. Higher ocean temperatures in summer plays a large role in the timing of when the ice will form again in winter. There is likely a considerable amount of heat remaining in the top layer of the ocean, which will need to be lost to the atmosphere and outer space before the region becomes fully ice covered.

Low Antarctic sea ice extent

Figure 5a. Antarctic sea ice concentration from AMSR2, in percent, for November 28, 2017. The Maud Rise polynya is seen at top.

Credit: University of Bremen
High-resolution image

Figure 5b. Small tabular icebergs are seen in the marginal ice zone of the northern Weddell Sea on November 22, 2017 during a NASA Operation IceBridge flight.

Credit: NASA/John Sonntag
High-resolution image

In the Southern Hemisphere, where it is late spring, sea ice declined at a faster-than-average pace after the very late-season October 12 maximum extent. This led to the third-lowest November average monthly extent in the satellite record, behind 1986 and 2016. Sea ice extent was near-average in all regions except the Weddell Sea, where extent is at a satellite-era record low.

The atmospheric circulation for November exhibited a very strong wave-3 pattern. In a wave-3 pattern, there are three major low-pressure areas around the continent separated by three high-pressure areas. Air temperatures for the month were near-average in most regions except for the eastern Weddell Sea, consistent with the reduced sea ice extent there.

The Maud Rise Polynya (Figure 5a) continued to grow through November, as increased sunshine and air temperatures allowed the upwelling warm water to expand the opening in the floating sea ice cover. At the beginning of December,  retreat of the sea ice edge converted the polynya to a large embayment in the sea ice cover.

Categories: Climate Science News

El Niño impacts erosion in the Peruvian Andes

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-12-06 02:11
El Niño and La Niña are the names of climate events occurring in the tropical Pacific Ocean, which are now globally infamous. They characterise a close relationship between the ocean and the atmosphere, in which the main protagonists can have devastating consequences worldwide. A recent study from French-Peruvian researchers published in Nature shows that extreme El Niño events also impact rainfall patterns and erosion in the western Peruvian Andes. More intense and more frequent rainfall events are observed during extreme El Niño events in the Peruvian Andes, especially in the Northern area. Catastrophic floods in Northern Peru and Ecuador are observed. In-situ river measurements and sediment accumulation measurements show greater erosion trends during the 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Niño events. Further information:
  • Applications, Climate: El Niño
  • Article on Nature, Scientific Reports: The impact of extreme El Niño events on modern sediment transport along the western Peruvian Andes (1968–2012)
Categories: Climate Science News

December 2017: Sea Level Rise impacts on Miami

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-12-06 02:03
Miami is very close to the sea, and at a very low altitude, so any above-normal sea level anomaly...
Categories: Climate Science News

20-26 November 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-11-30 06:37
Grande barrière: des chercheurs réussissent à transplanter du corail (La presse.ca, 2017/11/25) Environnement : un océan de déchets (France TV Info, 2017/11/25) 200 ours polaires amassés sur une île arctique russe à cause du réchauffement climatique (Huffingtonpost, 2017/11/23) Antarctic glacier's rough belly exposed (BBC, 2017/11/20) COP23: la voix de l’océan (Le Monde, 2017/11/20) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

Jason-2 IGDR reprocessing done

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-11-30 01:34
The IGDR processing configuration anomaly has been corrected. Jason-2 IGDR reprocessing is done and products are validated ok. The network delivery of products is now reactivated.
Categories: Climate Science News

13-19 November, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-11-23 07:05
La NASA sait l’eau de quel glacier inondera votre ville en cas de réchauffement climatique (Sputnik, 2017/11/17) Un futur satellite pour mesurer les courants marins et les vagues ? (INSU, 2017/11/16) La pollution au plastique constatée jusqu’au plus profond de l’océan (Consoglobe, 2017/11/16) Le permafrost, l’autre menace climatique (Le Monde, 2017/11/14) De plus en plus de mammifères marins s’échouent en France sans que l’on ne sache pourquoi (Daily Geek, 2017/11/14) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

November 2017: tracking water bodies

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-11-17 06:43
Jason-3 altimeter has a Digital Elevation Model tracking mode designed to overcome side reflections from steep-bkaned rivers
Categories: Climate Science News

[Sentinel-3A] New version of Non-Time-Critical Sentinel-3A L2P products

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-11-17 01:49
These products are processed by the Sentinel-3 L2P/L3 Marine Altimetry Service (CNES/CLS), in the frame of a EUMETSAT contract, funded by the European Union.  The new version 02_00 is disseminated by AVISO+ via ftp or AVISO+ CNES Data Center (see the product sheet). Note that the last cycle produced in version 01_00 has already been delivered (cycle 22). The next cycle 23 will be produced only in version 02_00.  With this new version:
  • the input data are the “spring 2017 reprocessed” version of input NTC L2 products fully detailed in the EUMETSAT S3A STM reprocessing technical note
  • the standards are the same as in 01_00 version
  • new cycles are available (cycles 5 to 11)
Categories: Climate Science News

5-12 November 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-11-16 06:38
Le cri d’alarme de quinze mille scientifiques sur l’état de la planète (Le Monde, 2017/11/13) COP23 : comment les pays s’engagent-ils pour l’océan et le climat ? (Le Monde, 2017/11/12) Africa’s Great Lake Hanging in the Balance (Earth Observatory, 2017/11/09) Le renouvellement de l’océan profond contraint par la forme du relief sous-marin (INSU, 2017/11/08) On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.
Categories: Climate Science News

Dissemination of incorrect Jason-2 IGDR products (cycles 507 to 512)

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-11-16 02:14
Due to a wrong processing configuration, Jason-2 IGDR cycles 507 to 512 are incorrect (datation bias of over 2ms, same anomaly as for cycles 505-506). These products have been deleted from avisoftp.cnes.fr server and must be discarded. The IGDR processing configuration anomaly has been identified. Jason-2 IGDR reprocessing is ongoing. Nevertheless, these products need validation before any dissemination. We expect to be back to nominal by the middle of next week.  We apologize for the inconvenience
Categories: Climate Science News

Water Action Day at COP23 : Niger Basin Authority (NBA) collects & disseminates satellite data

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-11-15 02:46
The Niger basin (4.200 km) encompasses 2,2 billions km² with very active phenomena, over nine countries (Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroun, Ivory Coast, Guinea, Mali, Niger, Nigeria and Chad). An authority to manage the basin was created The region has currently major security problems, leading to difficulties to maintain an in situ network. Satellites thus complement the existing network, and the Niger Basin Authority (NBA) is now disseminating satellite data over the basin. The next step will be to also use altimetry, including SWOT in the future. see http://sath.abn.ne/
Categories: Climate Science News
Syndicate content