Climate Science News

[Jason-2] Nominal production in Ssalto/Duacs products

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-04-05 01:01
The Jason-2 mission has been reintegrated in the Ssalto/Duacs processing system since April 4th, after validation. It includes data from 30/03/2017 in the “j2n” dataset.
Categories: Climate Science News

April 2017: How El Niño and related sea level fall impacted indonesian corals

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-31 09:52
When sea surface height is decreasing in Indonesia during an El Niño, the coral can be out of water...
Categories: Climate Science News

April 2017: How El Niño and related sea level fall impacted indonesian corals

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-31 09:52
When sea surface height is decreasing in Indonesia during an El Niño, the coral can be out of water...
Categories: Climate Science News

[JASON-2] now fully operational after the safe mode

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-31 00:11
The Jason-2 mission was interrupted during 350 hours and 14 minutes and the OGDR nominal production has been resumed on cycle 322, pass 137. The Ssalto/Duacs processing system will integrate these OGDR/IGDR data after a validation phase. The nominal production will restart next week with no missing data since March 15th. Further information:
  • Operational news: 
    • 2017-03-16, [JASON-2] Jason-2 in safe mode since  March 15th, 19:19 UTC
    • 2017-03-22, [JASON-2] after the safe mode, nominal activities restart
Categories: Climate Science News

[JASON-2] now fully operational after the safe mode

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-31 00:11
The Jason-2 mission was interrupted during 350 hours and 14 minutes and the OGDR nominal production has been resumed on cycle 322, pass 137. The Ssalto/Duacs processing system will integrate these OGDR/IGDR data after a validation phase. The nominal production will restart next week with no missing data since March 15th. Further information:
  • Operational news: 
    • 2017-03-16, [JASON-2] Jason-2 in safe mode since  March 15th, 19:19 UTC
    • 2017-03-22, [JASON-2] after the safe mode, nominal activities restart
Categories: Climate Science News

20-26 March, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-30 06:41
Les glaces hivernales de l’Arctique au plus bas depuis trente-huit ans (Le Monde, 2017/03/23)
Une planète à la mer (Le Monde, 2017/03/23)
Océans: Les zones mortes menacent de nombreux récifs coralliens (Goodplanet info,2017/03/21)
To the Arctic for Cryosat and Beyond (ESA, 2017/03/20)
On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.

Categories: Climate Science News

20-26 March, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-30 06:41
Les glaces hivernales de l’Arctique au plus bas depuis trente-huit ans (Le Monde, 2017/03/23)
Une planète à la mer (Le Monde, 2017/03/23)
Océans: Les zones mortes menacent de nombreux récifs coralliens (Goodplanet info,2017/03/21)
To the Arctic for Cryosat and Beyond (ESA, 2017/03/20)
On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.

Categories: Climate Science News

Along-track samples now available in AVISO’VIZ

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-30 05:25
We are pleased to announce the 2nd release of the Aviso+ Products Visualization Portal, also called AVISO’VIZ!  You will visualize samples of products referenced in the AVISO+ catalogue. These products are not updated in real time, they are representative of a short period in the past (December 2014). In this second version of the tool, along-track products (Level 2 and Level 3) complete already existing gridded products (Level 4 products and auxiliary products).  Do not hesitate to visit and test this visualization tool to discover new products!  
Categories: Climate Science News

Along-track samples now available in AVISO’VIZ

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-30 05:25
We are pleased to announce the 2nd release of the Aviso+ Products Visualization Portal, also called AVISO’VIZ!  You will visualize samples of products referenced in the AVISO+ catalogue. These products are not updated in real time, they are representative of a short period in the past (December 2014). In this second version of the tool, along-track products (Level 2 and Level 3) complete already existing gridded products (Level 4 products and auxiliary products).  Do not hesitate to visit and test this visualization tool to discover new products!  
Categories: Climate Science News

New Mean Sea Surface

AVISO Climate Change News - Sun, 2017-03-26 23:43
The key points of this CNES_CLS 2015 MSS are:
  • a drastic improvement of the shortest wavelengths,
  • a better correction of the oceanic variability,
  • more accuracy near the coast.
  • globally, strong reduction of errors when computing SLA
  • more homogeneity of accuracy compared to the former versions
This new version is based on a 20-year period (1993-2013) of altimetry data (mean profiles, geodetic mission and SLA): mean profiles from Topex/poseidon, ERS-2 , GFO, Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat; geodetic phase from ERS-1, Jason-1 and Cryosat-2. Further information:
  • Data: Auxiliary products: Mean Sea Surface
Categories: Climate Science News

New Mean Sea Surface

AVISO Climate Change News - Sun, 2017-03-26 23:43
The key points of this CNES_CLS 2015 MSS are:
  • a drastic improvement of the shortest wavelengths,
  • a better correction of the oceanic variability,
  • more accuracy near the coast.
  • globally, strong reduction of errors when computing SLA
  • more homogeneity of accuracy compared to the former versions
This new version is based on a 20-year period (1993-2013) of altimetry data (mean profiles, geodetic mission and SLA): mean profiles from Topex/poseidon, ERS-2 , GFO, Jason-1, Jason-2, and Envisat; geodetic phase from ERS-1, Jason-1 and Cryosat-2. Further information:
  • Data: Auxiliary products: Mean Sea Surface
Categories: Climate Science News

Jason-3 integrated in the Mean Sea Level processing

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-24 01:57
Almost three quarters of the Earth’s surface are covered by oceans: oceans are a key-element of our global climate system. It is a reality, the oceans respond to climate change: as a result of human activity and greenhouse gases, the climate is warming, the ocean expands and its level rises. Oceans are under close surveillance at all times: altimetry satellites accurately measure the sea level with a homogeneous and continuous global coverage since the launch of Topex-Poseidon in 1992. The Jason-3 mission complements this satellite constellation in flight by providing continuity of measurements that is essential for observing climate change. --> Use the interactive tool enabling to plot and download the Mean Sea Level trend times series and maps by selecting an area, a time-period (for time series only), one or several satellite missions. Further information:
  • Ocean indicators: Mean Sea Level, Processing and Corrections
  • Altimetry in videos for Jason-3 launch: Mean Sea Level
  • Applications: Mean Sea Level, Greenhouse effects
Categories: Climate Science News

Jason-3 integrated in the Mean Sea Level processing

AVISO Climate Change News - Fri, 2017-03-24 01:57
Almost three quarters of the Earth’s surface are covered by oceans: oceans are a key-element of our global climate system. It is a reality, the oceans respond to climate change: as a result of human activity and greenhouse gases, the climate is warming, the ocean expands and its level rises. Oceans are under close surveillance at all times: altimetry satellites accurately measure the sea level with a homogeneous and continuous global coverage since the launch of Topex-Poseidon in 1992. The Jason-3 mission complements this satellite constellation in flight by providing continuity of measurements that is essential for observing climate change. --> Use the interactive tool enabling to plot and download the Mean Sea Level trend times series and maps by selecting an area, a time-period (for time series only), one or several satellite missions. Further information:
  • Ocean indicators: Mean Sea Level, Processing and Corrections
  • Altimetry in videos for Jason-3 launch: Mean Sea Level
  • Applications: Mean Sea Level, Greenhouse effects
Categories: Climate Science News

12-19 March, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-23 08:07
Réchauffement climatique : l'ONU tire la sonnette d'alarme (France Info, 2017/03/21)
Pérou : des inondations ont fait au moins 65 morts depuis janvier (France 24, 2017/03/18)
Changement climatique : les océans se réchauffent plus vite que prévu (Numerama, 2017/03/13)
Un glacier bolivien préservé en Antarctique (Tribune de Genève, 2017/03/12)
UNE ÉPONGE GÉANTE POUR NETTOYER L'OCÉAN APRÈS UNE FUITE DE PÉTROLE (Le Monde, 2017/03/11)
On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.

Categories: Climate Science News

12-19 March, 2017 week

AVISO Climate Change News - Thu, 2017-03-23 08:07
Réchauffement climatique : l'ONU tire la sonnette d'alarme (France Info, 2017/03/21)
Pérou : des inondations ont fait au moins 65 morts depuis janvier (France 24, 2017/03/18)
Changement climatique : les océans se réchauffent plus vite que prévu (Numerama, 2017/03/13)
Un glacier bolivien préservé en Antarctique (Tribune de Genève, 2017/03/12)
UNE ÉPONGE GÉANTE POUR NETTOYER L'OCÉAN APRÈS UNE FUITE DE PÉTROLE (Le Monde, 2017/03/11)
On line availability of articles depends on the Newspaper/magazine. We can't thus certify that above articles will be freely and permanently available.

Categories: Climate Science News

Arctic sea ice maximum at record low for third straight year

NSIDC Artic Sea Ice News - Wed, 2017-03-22 10:00

Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual maximum extent on March 7. This is the lowest maximum in the 38-year satellite record. NSIDC will post a detailed analysis of the 2016 to 2017 winter sea ice conditions in our regular monthly post in early April.

Overview of conditions Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent for March 7, 2017 was 14.42 million square kilometers (5.57 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that day.

Figure 1. Arctic sea ice extent for March 7, 2017 was 14.42 million square kilometers (5.57 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that day. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

On March 7, 2017, Arctic sea ice likely reached its maximum extent for the year, at 14.42 million square kilometers (5.57 million square miles), the lowest in the 38-year satellite record. This year’s maximum extent is 1.22 million square kilometers (471,000 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average maximum of 15.64 million square kilometers (6.04 million square miles) and 97,000 square kilometers (37,000 square miles) below the previous lowest maximum that occurred on February 25, 2015. This year’s maximum is 100,000 square kilometers (39,000 square miles) below the 2016 maximum, which is now third lowest. (In 2016, we reported that year’s maximum as the lowest and 2015 the second lowest. An update to the Sea Ice Index last summer has changed our numbers slightly.)

Conditions in context Figure 2a. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of March 20, 2017, along with daily ice extent data for four previous years. 2016 to 2017 is shown in blue, 2015 to 2016 in green, 2014 to 2015 in orange, 2013 to 2014 in brown, and 2012 to 2013 in purple. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data.

Figure 2a. The graph above shows Arctic sea ice extent as of March 20, 2017, along with daily ice extent data for five previous years. 2016 to 2017 is shown in blue, 2015 to 2016 in green, 2014 to 2015 in orange, 2013 to 2014 in brown, 2012 to 2013 in purple, and 2011 to 2012 in dashed brown. The 1981 to 2010 median is in dark gray. The gray areas around the median line show the interquartile and interdecile ranges of the data. Sea Ice Index data.

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

Figure 2b. The plot shows Arctic air temperature differences at the 925 hPa level in degrees Celsius from October 1, 2016 to February 28, 2017. Yellows and reds indicate temperatures higher than the 1981 to 2010 average; blues and purples indicate temperatures lower than the 1981 to 2010 average.

Figure 2b. The plot shows Arctic air temperature differences at the 925 hPa level (about 2,500 feet above sea level) in degrees Celsius from October 1, 2016 to February 28, 2017. Yellows and reds indicate temperatures higher than the 1981 to 2010 average; blues and purples indicate temperatures lower than the 1981 to 2010 average.

Credit: NSIDC courtesy NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory Physical Sciences Division
High-resolution image

It was a very warm autumn and winter. Air temperatures at the 925 hPa level (about 2,500 feet above sea level) over the five months spanning October 2016 through February 2017 were more than 2.5 degrees Celsius (4.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above average over the entire Arctic Ocean, and greater than 5 degrees Celsius (9 degrees Fahrenheit) above average over large parts of the northern Chukchi and Barents Seas. These overall warm conditions were punctuated by a series of extreme heat waves over the Arctic Ocean.

Data from the European Space Agency’s CryoSat-2 satellite indicate that this winter’s ice cover may be only slightly thinner than that observed at this time of year for the past four years. However, an ice-ocean model at the University of Washington (PIOMAS) that incorporates observed weather conditions suggests the volume of ice in the Arctic is unusually low.

The Antarctic minimum Figure 3. Antarctic sea ice extent for March 3, 2017 was 2.11 million square kilometers (813,000 million square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 average extent for that day.

Figure 3. Antarctic sea ice extent for March 3, 2017 was 2.11 million square kilometers (815,000 square miles). The orange line shows the 1981 to 2010 median extent for that day. Sea Ice Index data. About the data

Credit: National Snow and Ice Data Center
High-resolution image

In the Southern Hemisphere, sea ice likely reached its minimum extent for the year on March 3, at 2.11 million square kilometers (815,000 square miles). This year’s minimum extent was the lowest in the satellite record, continuing a period of satellite-era record low daily extents that began in early November. However, the Antarctic system has been highly variable. As recently as 2015, Antarctic sea ice set record high daily extents, and in September 2014 reached a record high winter maximum.

The Antarctic minimum extent is 740,000 square kilometers (286,000 square miles) below the 1981 to 2010 average minimum of 2.85 million square kilometers (1.10 million square miles) and 184,000 square kilometers (71,000 square miles) below the previous lowest minimum that occurred on February 27, 1997.

Antarctic air temperatures during the autumn and winter were above average, but less so than in the Arctic. Air temperatures at the 925 hPa level (about 2,500 feet above sea level) near the sea ice edge have been about 1 to 2.5 degrees Celsius (2 to 4.5 degrees Fahrenheit) above the 1981 to 2010 average.

Final analysis pending

At the beginning of April, NSIDC scientists will release a full analysis of winter conditions, along with monthly data for March. For more information about the maximum extent and what it means, see the NSIDC Icelights post, the Arctic sea ice maximum.

Correction

On March 27, 2017, we made corrections to clarify the second paragraph under Conditions in context. The paragraph originally read:

Data from the European Space Agency’s CryoSat-2 satellite indicate that this winter’s ice cover is slightly thinner compared to the past four years. An ice-ocean model at the University of Washington that incorporates observed weather conditions suggests the volume of ice in the Arctic is unusually low for this time of year.

Categories: Climate Science News

[Jason-2] after the Safe Mode, nominal activities restart

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-03-22 08:55
The PMA GPS OnBoard SoftWare has been uploaded successfully on Jason-2's spacecraft. Nominal recovery activities restart today (2017/03/22). The exact foreseen sequence for restart is now to switch on Poseidon, AMR and GPSP on Friday 24th around 10:30UTC (2017/03/24). This means that the first products should be available around 13:00UTC, after a first orbit of measurements. However, please note that those first products could be impacted by the drag make-up maneuver that needs to be performed around 13:00UTC. Christophe Marechal, JA2/3 CNES project manager, on behalf of Jason-2 project managers from NOAA, EUMETSAT and JPL Linked articles:
  • [Jason-2] Jason-2 in safe mode since March 15th, 19:19 UTC
Categories: Climate Science News

[Jason-2] after the Safe Mode, nominal activities restart

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-03-22 08:55
The PMA GPS OnBoard SoftWare has been uploaded successfully on Jason-2's spacecraft. Nominal recovery activities restart today (2017/03/22). The exact foreseen sequence for restart is now to switch on Poseidon, AMR and GPSP on Friday 24th around 10:30UTC (2017/03/24). This means that the first products should be available around 13:00UTC, after a first orbit of measurements. However, please note that those first products could be impacted by the drag make-up maneuver that needs to be performed around 13:00UTC. Christophe Marechal, JA2/3 CNES project manager, on behalf of Jason-2 project managers from NOAA, EUMETSAT and JPL Linked articles:
  • [Jason-2] Jason-2 in safe mode since March 15th, 19:19 UTC
Categories: Climate Science News

22 March, World Water Day: views from space

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-03-22 00:21
Fresh water, essential for all life on Earth, is present in a finite amount on our planet (only 0.007% of all the planet's water is accessible for human consumption via rivers, streams, reservoirs and lakes).

In particular, it is essential for human activities. The consumption of fresh water is growing three times faster than the population. But global water resources are shared unequally between countries and continents: Asia accounts for 60% of the world’s population but has only 36% of its water, while South America has only 7% of the population but 30% of the water.

Today, water is no longer simply a problem for "poor countries": drought is increasingly afflicting areas of China, the USA, Australia and Europe. Aquifers are drying up and pollution and salinity are reducing water reserves even further. It has become essential to introduce tools to optimise the management of these resources.

At the moment, hydrology is essentially based on probes and gauging stations installed in situ at the edges of watercourses or lakes. But these instruments are distributed very unevenly across the surface of the globe, and it is often difficult to keep them properly maintained and calibrated. Satellite-based observation helps ensure the regularity and homogeneity of measurements from all over the planet. Satellite missions have led to major advances in environmental studies, including in the management of water resources. Among other achievements, nadir altimetry can acquire the height of the water of certain lakes or rivers, and the wide-swath altimetry made possible by SWOT will soon extend this possibility to include all inland waters.

Precipitation, evaporation and evapotranspiration, water levels and surface areas, the extent of frozen regions, soil moisture, groundwater reserves, water quality, surface water temperature, depth, mapping of watersheds – all this information can be and already is being provided today by Earth observation satellites. In addition, by combining all these sources, combining some of them with in situ measurements and/or with models, synoptic maps can be compiled on the situation of a watershed, a water deficit for example, risk maps, estimates of the flow of rivers, snowmelt, or the speed of the flow and shrinkage of glaciers.

The use of satellite observation in hydrology is bound to be called on increasingly, with ever more uses combining all available measurements and data, for better management of this most vital of resources: fresh water.

Categories: Climate Science News

22 March, World Water Day: views from space

AVISO Climate Change News - Wed, 2017-03-22 00:21
Fresh water, essential for all life on Earth, is present in a finite amount on our planet (only 0.007% of all the planet's water is accessible for human consumption via rivers, streams, reservoirs and lakes).

In particular, it is essential for human activities. The consumption of fresh water is growing three times faster than the population. But global water resources are shared unequally between countries and continents: Asia accounts for 60% of the world’s population but has only 36% of its water, while South America has only 7% of the population but 30% of the water.

Today, water is no longer simply a problem for "poor countries": drought is increasingly afflicting areas of China, the USA, Australia and Europe. Aquifers are drying up and pollution and salinity are reducing water reserves even further. It has become essential to introduce tools to optimise the management of these resources.

At the moment, hydrology is essentially based on probes and gauging stations installed in situ at the edges of watercourses or lakes. But these instruments are distributed very unevenly across the surface of the globe, and it is often difficult to keep them properly maintained and calibrated. Satellite-based observation helps ensure the regularity and homogeneity of measurements from all over the planet. Satellite missions have led to major advances in environmental studies, including in the management of water resources. Among other achievements, nadir altimetry can acquire the height of the water of certain lakes or rivers, and the wide-swath altimetry made possible by SWOT will soon extend this possibility to include all inland waters.

Precipitation, evaporation and evapotranspiration, water levels and surface areas, the extent of frozen regions, soil moisture, groundwater reserves, water quality, surface water temperature, depth, mapping of watersheds – all this information can be and already is being provided today by Earth observation satellites. In addition, by combining all these sources, combining some of them with in situ measurements and/or with models, synoptic maps can be compiled on the situation of a watershed, a water deficit for example, risk maps, estimates of the flow of rivers, snowmelt, or the speed of the flow and shrinkage of glaciers.

The use of satellite observation in hydrology is bound to be called on increasingly, with ever more uses combining all available measurements and data, for better management of this most vital of resources: fresh water.

Categories: Climate Science News
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